All posts filed under: Local

Dr. Emerald Archer- An Ambassador for Unstoppable Women

By Caitlyn Keeve   As the only women’s university in Los Angeles, and as our Unstoppable mission suggests, we are a community that persists towards the line of equality. In the past year, a number of Centers have been introduced with that same underlying spirit of daring advocacy. The Center for the Advancement of Women is a welcome addition to our campus-wide commitment to extend the conversation surrounding gender parity and activism. Dr. Emerald Archer, the Center Director, sees it as the first “outward and public-facing” space for both faculty and students at Mount Saint Mary’s University. In short, all the events and unique programming hosted by the Center for the Advancement of Women are meant to be both interactive and thought-provoking for students, faculty, staff, alumnae and community members. Although the message of empowerment is never far away from any one office or classroom, so far in her first year, Dr. Archer has worked with faculty and staff to produce our major gender equity initiatives on campus. Leadership, Research and Advocacy are the three …

5 Black Women Who Deserve Recognition

By Simone Soriano February (the shortest month of the year) is known for being Black History Month, but it is also Women’s History Month as well. While numerous black women deserve mention in this article, here are just five black women that deserve recognition. 1) Ida B. Wells (1862 – 1931) Long before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus, Wells refused to give up her seat on the train. When a gang of men forcibly removed her from the compartment, she later sued the company and won. Her most significant achievement was her anti-lynching journalism- documenting lynches down in the south and exposed them for the horrors that they were. 2) Marsha P. Johnson (1945 – 1992) Johnson was transgender, a drag-queen, and a significant player in the LGBT rights movement. Johnson helped led the Stonewall Riots of 1969 in New York when police officers raid the Stonewall Inn to arrest people for the grand crime of being Gay(Tm). 3) Bessie Stringfield (1911 – 1993) Beginning in the 1920s, Stringfield …

Flying Through Life with ‘Lady Bird’

Greta Gerwig and Saoirse Ronan in ‘Lady Bird’ (Photo Credit: LA Times) By Beatriz Garay Lady Bird deserves all four of its Golden Globe nominations and so much more. Lady Bird was released on November 3 and is the first film to get the highest score on Rotten Tomatoes – ever! It has been nominated for thirty-three awards across international platforms. I had the opportunity of attending a special screening of Lady Bird on Thursday, December 14 in Hollywood where the audience was able to converse with director Greta Gerwig and get an insight into her process for directing her film. Greta with her director of photography Sam Levy. (Photo Credit: Grace Hill Media)   The writing and the dialogue in the film are spectacular. This film is extremely relatable and authentic to the real, tough, and uncomfortable experiences teenagers go through in life. The film explores teenage struggles of fitting in and finding one’s identity, all while trying to keep a sane and moderately stable persona at home. Lady Bird is not your typical ‘Disney fairytale’ …

‘Equal Means Equal,’ Documentary About the ERA

By Estefani Alarcon When women gather and work together, magic happens. On Saturday, February 25th, “Never Turn Away a Woman” presented EQUAL MEANS EQUAL, a film by Kamala Lopez that educates Americans on the importance of equal rights under federal law for women. The film touches on the different issues women face such as domestic violence, sexual assault, homelessness, wage discrimination, poverty and the list goes on. These issues are not protected by the constitution for women. In the film, she connects all of these issues with one another and explains how this affects the future of women in the United States and across the globe. Lopez shared the stories of different women who have been victims of different crimes but their abusers are still free. Some of the cases presented on trial were dismissed and were evidence that women are not protected by the constitution. “When you have all of your rights given to you by laws they can be overturned by whoever happens to be in control of the white house and as …

Filmmakers Lack to Depict Women of Color as Business Owners

By Kimberly Aguilar With over 9.4 million women-owned business in the United States, stories of female entrepreneurs are rarely portrayed in the media. Some stories that do come to mind are depicted in recent movies such as It’s Complicated, Joy and The Intern. However, all three movies depict the female protagonists in almost the same way. While their stories show women who are self made, these films only show the White women that are successful when statistically over half of California’s women owned firms are owned by minority women. Women are 11% less employed than men and Randijah Simmons was tired of it. In 2014 at the age of 18, Simmons started her own clothing company, Sybergurl, because she did not have a job and needed money. Being born and raised in South Central Los Angeles, starting up her own business was no piece of cake. She did not have a business plan, model to follow or any money to back it up. “Building a brand from the ground up as one person and no financial backing is definitely a …

FIFA Speaks for the World

Written by Jessica Contreras Every four years, 32 countries zoom their attention in on one country and gather to watch 64 games for the worldwide dream, the FIFA World Cup. Carrying in an average of 3.5 billion viewers, the FIFA World Cup is the most viewed Sporting Event in the entire world. Brazil was the last host country for the World Cup in 2014, and it profited about 100 million dollars from the 4 billion dollars FIFA, the not-for-profit organization, made. The next World Cup is set to play out in 2018 and FIFA is constantly in search of and deciding host countries, schedules, and arrangements between countries. The United States is currently being considered for a bid as a host country for the FIFA World Cup in 2026. However, seven days into the new presidency, the new President of the United States implemented his fifth executive order. This order consists of a Travel Ban which prohibits “refugees from entering the country for 120 days and immigrants from seven Muslim-majority nations out for three months” …

A professor’s call to action to worried students post-election results

Written by Jessica Flores, Editor-in-Chief After a week of receiving emails from frightened Latina students who are afraid for themselves and their families because of the new president-elect, Marcos McPeek-Villatoro, decided to write a letter to his students. He expressed his opinions about the new age of Trump and encouraged them to continue their education. “I’m tired of my fellow Latinos living in constant, unmitigated fear of the injustices waiting for them in the near future. We need to speak up, loud and clear, against the racism that’s made people of color, once again, the victims of pure hate,” Villatoro said. He presented his letters in class, in Spanish and English, on Tuesday, Nov 15. Not only does he want to bring this issue to students’ attention, but also the faculty and staff members to come together as a community to create change fearlessly. Students recorded his speech on their phones to share on their social media. “Professor Villatoro’s speech helped me feel safer as a Latina following the election results. Also, as a current …

Americans look for silver lining as Donald Trump becomes president-elect

Written by Kimberly Aguilar, student submission “Make America great again.” For many people in the United States, the outcome of this election comes nothing close to Donald Trump’s popular campaign slogan. For immigrants, African-Americans, the LGBTQ community, and many more minority brothers and sisters, this can be either the beginning of revolutionary times or another dark period for those who have been harshly relegated. In the end, this is nothing the resilient people of America cannot handle. In 2015, Bernie Sanders announced his campaign sparking inspiration and passion into many like a million fire ants clustering around a crack on wood. Although he did not win the vote of America, he truly won the heart of Americans. His unforgettable presence in the race made way for unspoken discussions on debt-free college, Wall Street reformations, and most importantly redirecting money from politics into the restoration of democracy. His loss against Hillary Clinton extinguished the fire in millennials rooting for change, but his campaign sparked enlightenment and fueled the fight against a crooked system. Ultimately, it may …

How Facebook memes educate us about #NoDAPL and America’s history of marginalization

Written by Ava Graciela Rutter, Staff Writer On Oct 31, a global Facebook meme encouraged users worldwide to “check in” their location at Standing Rock, North Dakota, the epicenter of the #NoDAPL movement. The posts attempted to prevent police efforts to track protestors of the Dakota Access Pipeline, a controversial interstate oil project running through Native American sacred grounds. Instead, the online posts accomplished something better than its original goal: It brought public attention to the issue of marginalization in the US. “I first found out about the protests fairly recently through social media,” says Meghan Puich, who participated in the check-in movement after some deliberation. “To be completely honest, I was very skeptical at first of the credibility of the post and the actual impact it was making.” It was this skepticism that inspired her to investigate further, and it turned out to be relevant to her environmental studies at UC Santa Cruz. Despite safety precautions, the pipeline poses a risk of contaminating the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s primary water source. This conflict of …

From tweets to the streets: Protesting as a Latinx for Black Lives Matter

Written by Pauline Mikhail, Staff Writer #LaGenteUnidas – “The United People” – is not just a trending hashtag to the Latinx community. Their unity with the Black Lives Matter movement means protesting police brutality and racism alongside other BLM supporters. One such supporter is Yanira Fuentes Barajas, a Latinx resident of Charlotte, North Carolina. She attended a protest in the days following the Sep 20 death of Keith Lamont Scott, a black man fatally shot by police. She explained, “I took part of the protest because I believe it was wrong what was done to Keith Lamont Scott. He was the wrong suspect and got killed being unarmed.” Standing by her beliefs meant risking police confrontation. “The first night [Sep 23] was pretty intense… There was a time during the protest when we all laid on the floor in front of Uptowns Police Department,” said Fuentes, who stayed with protesters an hour after the midnightcurfew. “Once it hit 12 [AM], riot officers came in [police] cars with zip ties and were armed and ready to arrest …