All posts filed under: Film & Television

‘Equal Means Equal,’ Documentary About the ERA

By Estefani Alarcon When women gather and work together, magic happens. On Saturday, February 25th, “Never Turn Away a Woman” presented EQUAL MEANS EQUAL, a film by Kamala Lopez that educates Americans on the importance of equal rights under federal law for women. The film touches on the different issues women face such as domestic violence, sexual assault, homelessness, wage discrimination, poverty and the list goes on. These issues are not protected by the constitution for women. In the film, she connects all of these issues with one another and explains how this affects the future of women in the United States and across the globe. Lopez shared the stories of different women who have been victims of different crimes but their abusers are still free. Some of the cases presented on trial were dismissed and were evidence that women are not protected by the constitution. “When you have all of your rights given to you by laws they can be overturned by whoever happens to be in control of the white house and as …

‘Newsies’ Review

By Carsie Mendoza Musical theatre is a big part of my life. From the numerous original cast albums downloaded on my phone and computer to the varied assortment of memorable quotes from Broadway shows that serve as motivation. So when the live-recorded production of Newsies came out in select movie theaters February 16th, 18th, and 22nd, I knew that seeing it was a must. Newsies is a musical based on the New York paperboy strike in 1899 and deals with the harsh realities of that time when children were trying their best to survive by working for companies that had no concern for their well-being. Additionally, it covers something that is becoming ever more relevant in today’s society: the desire to have your voice be heard in a world ruled by elites that only have personal interests and the struggle to keep voices raised when everything is against you. Live-recorded productions of musicals, especially ones that have a huge following like Newsies does, can either be a hit or a miss. On the hit side, …

Jane the Virgin continues to break down barriers for women and Latinas everywhere

Written by Kimberly Aguilar, Staff Writer As Jane the Virgin takes on its third season, it continues taking on a “beautifully nuanced approach to women’s sexuality.” Magazines, such as Cosmopolitan, are naming it CW’s best show ever and it’s for all the right reasons. The show captures one of the greatest facts that television fails to portray: not all Latina characters are maids or women like Sofia Vergara. Our Los Angeles population consists of nearly 48% women and girls of Latina descent and they are also the youngest female ethnic group in California. Jane the Virgin tackles many issues Latinas face from their virginity to immigration, and the best part about it is that the show does not shy away from how vocal they want to be about it. Some of the best scenes take place in the midst of the crisis, which is usually when things unravel. In an episode where Jane Villanueva (played by Gina Rodriguez) finds out she is pregnant, her mother, Xiomara Villanueva (played by Andrea Navedo) asks her if having …

Tim Burton keeps it peculiar with his new film

Written by Makayla Williams, Staff Writer It’s almost as if Ransom Riggs wrote Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children with the hopes that Tim Burton would adapt it for film someday, and why not? Burton’s oddball filmmaking sensibilities perfectly fit the world that Riggs crafted in his 2011 YA novel; a book that takes creepy photography and pairs it with a fantastical tale centering around Florida teen Jacob and his discovery of an orphanage that housed supernatural children. In the film, Burton shows that there’s a method to his gothic and even grotesque madness. Style is essential to storytelling for him. Without it, Burton’s oddly engrossing imagination alone can’t arouse viewers’ interest (take Dark Shadows for example). In Miss Peregrine, his style is what sucks the viewer into Jacob’s story. But without great storytelling, viewers won’t even believe that a well-dressed kid can project his dreams onto a wall in spite of it happening in front of them. On paper, Miss Peregrine and Burton are a perfect match of director and source material. The film’s main …