Month: June 2016

How music changed C5’s life completely

Written by Jessica Flores, Editor-in-Chief It’s either all or nothing for Christopher Pressley a.k.a. “C5.” It all began when he got his first studio equipment and began recording music all day with his friends at his father’s house which he used to call “pops’ trap.” North Oakland, California is his hometown which inspired his stage name C5. C is for Christopher and 5 is short for the street he grew up in–59th street–which is often called “the 5” in the bay. “I started calling myself C5 and it just fit. Everyone started calling me 5 or C5–it’s my block name,” he said. Now an Angeleno and recent college graduate, it wasn’t until he received his acceptance letter from Cal State University Dominguez Hills that changed his life completely. Before moving out to L.A., he was “deep, deep in the streets,” he said. “I was selling crack, weed, etc. In 2011, I got arrested and did time in juvenile. [Then] I violated my probation and was supposed to go to jail for 6 months and that …

California’s first black professor taught at the Mount

Written by Victoria McCargar, University Archivist SKIMMING THROUGH THE 1957 YEARBOOK, we noticed that among the 10 smiling members of the Nursing Department faculty was an African-American woman identified as Mrs. Betty Williams. We wondered whether that was unusual — how many faculties at California colleges and universities had black faculty in those days? It didn’t take Google long to produce an answer: Our Betty Smith Williams was the first black professor in California — male or female, in any subject, anywhere in higher education. It says so right here.   Should we be surprised? After all, the Mount graduated a young African-American woman, Vivian Burgess ’52, from its first-in-California bachelor’s in nursing program. The brilliant Sister who made that happen, Rebecca Doan, CSJ, was still chair of Nursing in the fall of 1956 when Betty Williams broke the color barrier and joined the faculty. Williams herself had already broken that same  barrier when she became the first African-American to earn a master’s in nursing at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio in 1954. She taught at the Mount for …