Month: March 2016

Sexism scandal causes Indian Wells CEO to resign

Written by Liz Charre, Staff Writer  Last Sunday, Serena Williams blasted Raymond Moore after he made sexist remarks before the Women’s BNP Paribas Open final in Indian Wells, California. Moore spoke at a press conference and stated that female tennis players should “go down every night on their knees and thank God for male players.” Many female players did not take his comments lightly. Serena Williams, after her straight sets loss to Victoria Azarenka, immediately responded to Moore’s statement saying, “those remarks are much mistaken and very, very, very, inaccurate.” Moore did issue an apology after Williams called him out and then resigned his place the day after the incident arose and caught the attention of so many athletes. However, Moore was not the only male who was making sexist remarks about tennis. Novak Djokovic, from Serbia, also had some critical things to say about women’s tennis. Djokovic, however, did credit female tennis players for changing the game but did indicate that men should fight more on the prize money being distributed for winning grand …

Band-aids don’t fix bullet holes

Written by Jessica Flores, Treasurer  Lawrence Ross’ presentation at the Doheny campus touched on a topic many people flee away from: racism. One of the many topics he educated the audience on was institutional racism on college and university campuses across the country, focusing on black college students. He emphasized the importance of not only diversity but inclusion in all institutions. Students were advised to voice what they want to see in their classrooms and campuses. As I left Ross’ presentation, I could not help but question the diversity and inclusion of black students here at Mount Saint Mary’s. I sat with black students Cierra Black, Sydnei Jones, and Amber Bradley, who also attended the event, as they reflected on the presentation and how it connects to our community. Sydnei Jones, junior, said, “[Ross] stated the obvious in ways we couldn’t in the past.” They have asked for more cultural classes at the Mount so students have a better understanding of all cultures. Cierra said, “All the black history I know, [I learned] outside of class. …

Athenians fostering a spirit to serve others

Written by Jessica Lopez, student submission Hello, Mount Community! A few weeks ago one of my professors brought in a guest speaker from Lily Of the Valley Endeavors (L.O.V.E.) to present their mission to our class. She told us story after story that made each one of us laugh, gasp, and personally, tear up. L.O.V.E has been rescuing AIDS infected, and affected babies in Africa grow into healthy and educated individuals. Their mission is selfless in all aspects. It is important for me to mention that with all of their great work they are currently looking to expand their orphanage by building a vocational village for those over 18 years old. The babies that they rescued have now grown up and require a different space to cultivate their development. The guest speaker’s goal was to get us to choose her organization as our service project for the class. However, I like to believe that she chose us and not the other way around. We have the opportunity to be a part of their mission by …

Back at it again with the Word of Mouth

The Athenian Print  This Wednesday, March 16 the Athenian Print and Student Affairs will come together for their biannual Word of Mouth event that will take place from 6:30-8:30pm. The open-mic gathering is a time for all Athenians to come out and express themselves through the power of expression. You can perform a song, dance, poem, or simply cheer for your fellow peers under the moonlight, just outside the Campus Center. Complimentary drinks and refreshments will be available at the event.

When unique opportunities exceed comfort zones

Written by Jessica Lopez, student submission  It is an eye-opening experience to step out of your comfort zone. Personally, this means not limiting myself to set paths within my major. As a business major, I never considered the idea of participating in the public policy program until this year, my senior year. It wasn’t until I started talking to people who I found out that the Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN) is not only for political science majors but for everyone. I thought: How can a program based off of public policy in Washington, D.C. be for me? Simple, in my years here at the Mount, health equity has been one of the public policies in which I have become an avid advocate. So much that one of my closest friends and I are in the beginning stages of creating our nonprofit on health equity. Starting a nonprofit requires a lengthy amount of research and a lot of dedication. As my senior year comes to an end, I have not given 100% of my dedication …

Dr. Brueck on her newest publication

Written by Tamara Murga, Editor-in-Chief  To some, the thought of writing a poem or anything that requires the collision between pen and paper is cringe-worthy. When it comes to the act of writing, many simply stick to the making of their grocery list, or typing a long, angry text message. The cliché but honest form of writer’s block begins with the staring at a blank piece of paper or computer screen. When these moments linger long enough, the anxiety soon unfolds. The truth is, however, that even experienced writers go through this overwhelming process. The difference with Dr. Katherine Brueck, author and English Professor at the Mount, is that she knows how to defeat it: write even when you cannot. Through the power of strong sentiment, Dr. Brueck proudly presents her most recent work “Voiceless Love” at Chalon on March 15. Dr. Brueck’s relationship with writing originates with being a John Carroll University undergraduate student. She then continued for her M.A. at Purdue University and pursued her PhD in Comparative Literature at University of Illinois. …

If not me, then who else?

Faces of the Mount Name: Phylizia Carrillo Majors: Political Science and Global Politics Minors: Philosophy and Film, Media, and Social Justice “I picked these majors because I didn’t see anyone else doing it. I thought, ‘If not me, then who else?’ I’m interested in politics, and hopefully, I’ll be able to run or lead with either policy or anything like that. I was trying to look for role models and didn’t see anyone, so I was just like, well I’ll do it.  It’s pretty cool to lay your own path. It’s very cliché, but just do it. Do it on your own terms and on your own time because a lot of people, especially women, get very focused on the obstacles ahead of them that they don’t even start. Recently, I was in DC and across the White House there’s something called “The Anti-War Peace Vigil” and it’s the longest running peace protest in the U.S.  This one guy who just sits there for 12-55 hour shifts says ‘hi’ to people and educates them. I went up to him and he told me about his life. First glance, you might think he was homeless, but …

A tribute to lolo

Written by Hazel Anne Agustin, poem submission  we do not dare call you grandfather, we do not dare call you grandpa. to belittle you with weightless english words is to forget the history of your hands and how you planted us here years and years ago, with isang peso still saved inside your pantalon and how the only word you needed translated was trabajo. we do not dare call you out of your native tongue. your home today does not settle on foreign land, you brought Paniqui here with you, cooking with talong, sitaw, and ampalaya shamelessly in your favorite sando and worn-out chinelas its aroma’s so strong that the scent of chicken adobo lingers for days. the kitchen was your home. the other rooms vacant, untouched spaces. you planted seeds sa lupa that America had never touched and she accepted them graciously, letting you plant in her damp soil and birthing upo on sturdy stems. you taught her to say thank you in a different language. your weary hands had assembled airplane parts by day and only asked for familiarity by night. and so you planted your garden and ate with your kamay, and peeled kalamansi, and hung your clothes out to dry, and sang Magic Sing! and washed rice over the sink with one hand clasping the bowl …